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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

6 edition of The relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution found in the catalog.

The relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution

by Arthur J. Mekeel

  • 106 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by University Press of America in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Society of Friends -- United States -- History -- 18th century.,
    • United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Religious aspects -- Society of Friends.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementArthur J. Mekeel.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE269.F8 M44 1979
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 368 p. ;
      Number of Pages368
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4431920M
      ISBN 100819107921
      LC Control Number79066173
      OCLC/WorldCa5816283

      William Woods University Professor Craig Bruce Smith taught a class about the American Revolution and the Continental Ap Slavery and Quakers in 17th Century Barbados. In short, the Quakers held fast to their beliefs and, for the most part, remained neutral throughout the American Revolution. References. 1. Arthur Meikel, The Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution University Press, 2.

      American Revolution, –83, struggle by which the Thirteen Colonies on the Atlantic seaboard of North America won independence from Great Britain and became the United States. It is also called the American War of Independence. Causes and Early Troubles By the middle of the 18th cent., differences in life, thought, and interests had developed between the mother country and the growing. When the Civil War began, many people of different religious faiths supported the Confederate war effort. A number of Protestant ministers even served in the military. Yet, one religious group—the Quakers—went against majority opinion and refused to support the war. From the early years of the North Carolina colony, the Quakers, or Society of Friends, held certain beliefs that differed.

      The overlooked Quaker from Rhode Island who won the American Revolution's crucial southern campaign and helped to set up the final victory of American independence at YorktownNathanael Greene is a revolutionary hero who has been lost to history. Although places named in his honor dot city and country, few people know his quintessentially American story as a self-made, self-educated 4/5(2). Quakers are pacifists. Yet, during the Revolution many Friends felt the American cause was so great that they had to take up arms. Once they did this, they were "read out" of meeting. (Quakers worship at meeting houses.) At Philadelphia's Free Quaker Meeting House, fifty "read out" Friends — including Betsy Ross — came together to pray.


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The relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution by Arthur J. Mekeel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Out of 5 stars The Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution Reviewed in the United States on A classic resource for scholars of the American Revolution, Mekeel's book is eminently readable and provides a well-balanced account of Quaker life during the American Cited by: out of 5 stars The Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution Reviewed in the United States on A classic resource for scholars of the American Revolution, Mekeel's book is eminently readable and provides a well-balanced account of Quaker life during the American 5/5.

The Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution. Arthur J. Mekeel able accept action activities affirmation American appointed army Assembly authorities Book Boston Britain British called cause Collection colonies committee concerned conduct Congress cons conside Continent Council The Relation of the Quakers to the American.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: vii, pages ; 23 cm: Contents: The Quakers in America in the eighteenth century --Problems of empire --The Quakers take alarm --The breakdown of non-importation and the challenge to Quaker policy --The tea crisis and its sequel --The Quakers cast their lot --Conciliation efforts of the British Quakers --The first year of war.

Quakers, also called Friends, are a historically Christian denomination known formally as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church. Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united by their belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access the light within, or "that of God in every one".

Some profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine. Role of Quakers in the American Revolution Image: Quaker Founder George Fox The Religious Society of Friends, commonly called Quakers has opposed war and violence from its inception, and has sought instead to do away with the causes of war and alleviate the suffering it causes.

George Fox, the founder of the Friends, preached in the s that there was a divine spark within each person, which. The Revolution split some denominations, notably the Church of England, whose ministers were bound by oath to support the King, and the Quakers, who were traditionally pacifists.

Religious practice suffered in certain places because of the absence of ministers and the destruction of churches, but in other areas, religion flourished.

Quakers, or the Religious Society of Friends, was founded in England in the 17th century by George Fox and played a key role in abolition and women’s suffrage. Prior to the American Revolution, Quakers disowned Betsy Ross (), honored throughout history as the maker of the Flag of the United States, and General Nathanael Greene (), George Washington's gifted and most dependable officer.

The Friends also refused to provide any financial support for wartime activities. QUAKERHISTORY The Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution. By Arthur J. Mekeel. (Washington, D.C.: University Press of America, Pp. vii, $) This book is a study of the relationship of the Society of Friends in America to the developing constitutional crisis between the colonies and the Friends engaged in bitter protests along with their fellow colonists.

They. The formal name of the Quakers, The Religious Society of Friends, was adopted during this period and has been used ever since. If you have Quaker ancestors, you are in luck, because Quakers are well known for keeping excellent records.

There are detailed records of births, deaths, and marriages of Quakers going back to the early ’s. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Rev. and updated version of doctoral dissertation: The relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution. The ecological model in The New Ecology of Leadership shows enterprises as being conceived in passion and born in communities of trust and practice.

My insights into this dynamic were first guided by my discovery of the Society of Friends, or the Quakers, as they are better known and the role that they played in the First Industrial Revolution. That changed during the American Revolution when Quakers refused to pay military taxes or fight in the war.

Some Quakers were exiled because of that position. In the early 19th century, Quakers rallied against the social abuses of the day: slavery, poverty, horrible prison conditions, and mistreatment of Native Americans.

Arthur J. Mekeel, Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution (Washington DC: University Press of America., ), [7] Daniel Byrnes. A short address to the English colonies in North-America. A good summary of the Quaker Peace Testimony and its relation to military fines and taxes can be found in Stephen B.

Weeks’s Southern Quakers and Slavery: A Study in Institutional History (). Today I’ll reproduce some excerpts from that book that speak to Quaker tax resistance in the years before the American Revolution. The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War for the Soul of the South by Andrew Waters (Casemate, ).

Among America’s great historical sites is the fort that still sits in the Charleston harbor where the first shots of. “World of Trouble: A Philadelphia Quaker Family’s Journey through the American Revolution” (Yale University Press) tells a familiar story from an unfamiliar perspective, presenting a dual biography of a Quaker couple, Henry and Elizabeth Drinker, who claimed allegiance neither to the revolution nor the British Crown.

The American Revolution was an accelerated evolution rather than a cataclysmic revolution to a certain point. An accelerated evolution is a rapid process of growth and change, while a cataclysmic revolution is a sudden and violent event that brings great changes.

The extent to which the American Revolution was an accelerated evolution was during events that completely disregarded. In short, the Quakers held fast to their beliefs and, for the most part, remained neutral throughout the American Revolution. References 1. Arthur Meikel, The Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution University Press, 2.

Peter N. Carroll, ed., Religion and the Coming of the American Revolution Waltham, Mass. Ginn-Blaisdell, 3. An intimate account of the American Revolution as seen through the eyes of a Quaker pacifist couple living in Philadelphia Historian Richard Godbeer presents a richly layered and intimate account of the American Revolution as experienced by a Philadelphia Quaker couple, Elizabeth Drinker and the merchant Henry Drinker, who barely survived the unique perils that Quakers faced during that.InMekeel updated the work, incorporating the scholarship of four decades, and published it with the University Press of America under the title, The Relation of the Quakers to the American Revolution.

When the book went out of print several years ago, many scholars urged the author to republish. Fortunately, Mekeel complied.Before the American Revolution even occurred, the middle-starters of Pennsylvania–the Quakers–were already In search of a place where they could be different and be, at least, its very nature, the Quakers provided an environment where people who would otherwise have been misfits and malcontents could flourish and.